Cheers Damo

Irv
Irv

Currently on a buying trip in Europe. Just landed in Rome and it is as hot as hell so I decided to go grab a cold beer and people watch for an hour or so at the Piazza Di Navona. On the way I saw a sign for antiques and decided to go take a look. The shop owner had a decent collection of oriental but all a little late for me except for one great piece stuck in the bottom of his cabinet. A very well cast bronze figure of Damo dating to the late Ming period, I bought it instantly. Lets hope this is a sign of things to come on this trip. Cheers Damo…

Peter Combs – Chinese Antique Dealer – Boston Massachusetts

Irv
Irv

Peter Combs does a great weekly V-log on YouTube covering up and coming eBay Chinese antique lots. He presents very well and is very articulate. He is based in US and sells on eBay now and then. I have subscribed to his YouTube channel and I suggest you do the same. He is good to watch with well put together professional videos. He talks about fakes, online and off auctions, good sellers and bad sellers and many other topic Chinese antique related. He highlights items he feels are worth bidding on and items that he feels should be avoided. Overall well worth subscribing to his channel, I guarantee you will enjoy his weekly uploads. Subscribe Here

Jung Chang – Empress Dowager Cixi

One of the best books I have ever read. If your into Chinese history I fully recommend you buy this book it is a real eye opener.

Based on newly available, mostly Chinese, historical documents such as court records, official and private correspondence, diaries and eyewitness accounts, this biography will revolutionize historical thinking about a crucial period in China’s—and the world’s—history.

Born in 1835 into a family of Manchu government officials, she entered the Forbidden City as a concubine to the emperor Xianfeng. Although graded third rank, her standing in court improved in 1856 when she bore a son, a helpful move for a woman in China, even today.

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Xuande Burning Bright

Zhang Zhiwei carves a wax mould in preparation for the casting.
Zhang Zhiwei carves a wax mould in preparation for the casting.

There is an old shabby workshop in Langshan town on the southern outskirts of Nantong, Jiangsu province. Barrels holding some unknown liquid are placed in the corner of the courtyard. A few vigilant dogs bark at newcomers. Inside, workers busily prepare to light a furnace. The room is filled with numerous half-finished copper incense burners and it is hard to believe that this is the birthplace of such delicate art. Zhang Zhiwei, a 52-year-old Nantong native, is the creator of all these pieces.

“If I have to select something I am most proud of, it must be these incense burners,” Zhang says, staring at a provincial-level award certificate hanging on the wall, which proclaims his contribution to the rebirth of Xuande Lu.

Xuande Lu, or Xuande incense burner, was first made for the royal families during the reign of Xuande (1425-35) in the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), and it is generally considered to be China’s top-class copperware variety. The wealthy emperor Zhu Zhanji was a fanatical fan of such vessels.

It is said he imported large amounts of copper from Siam (today’s Thailand), and he ordered the artisans to make 3,000 furnaces based on the shapes of classical Chinese porcelains.

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